VRS474 – How to Future-Proof Your Short-Term Rental Business for 2023


This episode of the Vacation Rental Success Podcast is sponsored by OwnerRez
The World's Most Powerful Vacation RentalManagement Platform That Homeowners And PMs Rely On


We often don’t think beyond the next season – the OTAs have led us to believe in their all-powerfulness to bring income in a steady stream, but this is a myth that is becoming busted, in fact, the phrase Airbnb-Bust is heard more often as exponents of the platform are seeing a decline in bookings that isn’t showing much sign of an uplift.

If the Covid 19 era taught us anything it was that being unprepared for what might happen was a dangerous scenario.  It was one that left some hosts, managers, and larger companies struggling or even collapsing.

There is a lot that isn’t clear about the upcoming year.

Are we going into a recession?

Will there be a housing bust?

Will interest rates keep rising?

What is crystal clear is that getting rich off Airbnb will not be the theme of 2023.

In this episode, I explore how some savvy strategic moves can put us all in a better position to meet the challenges of uncertain times.

You’ll hear:

  • The future-proofing formula to power through challenges and difficult times
  • Why and how a California-based couple is moving their focus from Airbnb to a direct book model
  • How powerful niche listing sites can be and why you should give them a decent chance
  • Ways to diversify your marketing to avoid the Airbnb Bust
  • How a simple QR code and a landing page can drive more traffic to your website
  • The power of content, telling stories, and answering guest questions
  • Why keeping up with industry trends will set you apart from the competition
  • Some hospitality fails and how simple changes can build a loyal following
  • The low percentage of WOM marketing that happens online and how to harness the offline potential
  • Why you should never stop learning.

Links:

AirDNA’s 2023 outlook

The Airbnb Bust – Business Insider   

Fabstayz

They Ask You Answer – Marcus Sheridan

Everybody Writes – Ann Handley

Booking.com – Sustainable Travel Report 2022

Contagious, Why Things Catch On  – Jonah BergerCustomer Service Revolution – John Dijulius

Mike Bayer

Welcome to this episode of the Vacation Rental Success Podcast. This episode is brought to you by the kind sponsorship from OwnerRez, providing a powerful and flexible system for managing vacation rental properties. OwnerRez provides booking and maintenance management, payment scheduling and collection, as well as insightful reporting. OwnerRez will provide you with a long-term booking foundation that is scalable for your vacation rental business, while fully managing your channel listings, but still focusing on your brand, your website, and your way of doing things. Listen into the mid-episode break where we will hear more about this internationally recognized leader in vacation rental software. For more information about OwnerRez, click the link in the description of this episode on your smart device. Let's get started, here's your host, Heather Bayer.

Heather Bayer

Today I'm talking about future-proofing your business for 2023. We've been through some tough years and we are heading into what could be an even tougher one, or it could be a much smoother one, and it all depends on you. Listen in.

Heather Bayer

This is the Vacation Rental Success Podcast, keeping you up-to-date with news, views, information and resources on this rapidly changing short-term rental business. I'm your host, Heather Bayer, and with 25 years of experience in this industry, I'm making sure you know what's hot, what's not, what's new, and what will help make your business a success.

Heather Bayer

Well, hello and welcome to another episode of the Vacation Rental Success Podcast, and this is the last one of 2022. If you're listening on the day of publication, we're just in that middle bit between Christmas and New Year, and it's been an odd one for me. I'm down here in Gulf Shores, Alabama. No family this year. Sorry Mike, sorry Andrea, sorry grandkids. We weren't there for all that snow that came down, and I know you guys had a great Christmas and I'm sure all my listening audience did as well. We did – very quietly here in Alabama in the freezing temperatures, which we didn't sign up for!

Heather Bayer

We came down here for the sunshine, the flip-flops, the shorts and T-shirts, and I ended up with a nice woolly hat, scarf, gloves that weren't even up to the job, and some furry boots, which is not a lot different from what I'd be wearing at home. But hey, the temperature is forecast to go up over the next few days and we'll be back in snowbird territory as we head into 2023. Always weird coming to the end of a year. Years ago, it used to be this big, big thing. You know, New Year's Eve parties and fireworks and celebrations and all that hugging at midnight. And I have to say, I have not seen midnight for quite a few years, it's maybe a decade or more since I've stayed up after 10:00pm at night. I'm an early riser, so regardless of what day it is, I don't tend to stay the course to late nights anymore. But anyway, as we get into a new year, I know people are planning for what's going to happen in the next year. We're setting goals, we're making resolutions; that's something else I don't do anymore. I do set goals, I just don't make resolutions.  And I do think there's a big difference between them.

Heather Bayer

But hey, what I'm talking about today is future-proofing, your business for this coming year. And what do I mean by that? What is future-proofing? If you look it up – you Google it – it's going to tell you “It's a form of strategic planning that considers the long-term wellbeing of a company and its mission to promote success for years to come.” Well, there you are, that's future-proofing. Let's put that in lay terms. It means you need to be doing the things that's going to make your business survive for another year, and let's face it, we've had a couple of really tough years. Even if you made lots of money in 2020, in 2021, and maybe in 2022, it was tough along the way. I know it was for us running a property management business in Ontario when we were shut down for long periods of time.

Heather Bayer

Then we went through the real estate boom, when everybody was out there looking for these second homes and cottage properties and prices were going just spectacularly high and people were buying without thinking, and they really were buying without thinking because there was no time to think.  If something came on the market, it would be gone within hours. Not within days or weeks, but within hours, sometimes minutes. The moment a new property came onto the realty board, the realtors would be on the phone to their clients, sending them the information, often before it even got online. And those properties, so many of them, were bought sight unseen, without any home inspections, without any other conditions put upon the purchase of the property or the sale of the property. And unfortunately for some, that's come back to bite, because in our area some of these cottage properties are a little bit old.  Many of the older ones didn't conform to building permits, and some of these new owners are finding now that their properties are not as sound as they thought they were. And then of course, things changed over the latter part of 2022 as demand began to slump. And of course we had this massive supply and that's what I'm going to be talking about in this episode. What can we do about that? Because we often don't think beyond the next season.

Heather Bayer

The OTAs, Airbnb, Vrbo, Booking.com, etc., have led us to believe in their all-powerfulness to bring income in this steady stream.  But this is a myth that's becoming busted, and in fact, the phrase ‘Airbnb bust' is heard more often now as exponents of the platform are seeing a decline in bookings. And it's not showing much sign of an uplift at the moment for them. You only need to go to the Facebook groups to see this continuous stream of people saying, “I've not got the bookings I was expecting”. And certainly in many areas winter bookings, Christmas bookings, were down – so many reasons for this. But I need to say that the stats are saying that demand is actually not dropping like a stone as some would think. AirDNA came out with what they call their 2023 Outlook, which actually talks about demand continuing to increase. But they also said in that, that of the 1.2 million Airbnb listings in the US, 62% have been added since 2020, and that really says it all. Demand may still be continuing to rise, but the supply has become massive and supply is way overreaching the demand at the moment. The good news is that supply may begin to level off as the cost of investing in real estate goes up and higher mortgage costs lessen the appeal.

Heather Bayer

And those who bought in that frenzy are now struggling, and may have to sell. I don't know a huge amount about markets, but from my lay viewpoint, these things all seem to balance out in the end. But that doesn't help you if you're struggling at the moment, does it? But I think it's very clear that getting rich off Airbnb is not the theme of 2023.

Heather Bayer

I read an article in Business Insider, it was about a couple in California called Sarah and Tony Robinson, you may have come across them. They call themselves the Real Estate Robinsons and two years ago they left their jobs at Tesla and iHeartRadio to full-time manage their portfolio. They've got 22 active vacation rental properties, mostly in Tennessee and California, and they spend a lot of time on social media.  If you consider their follower stats, 30,000 followers on YouTube and a combined 80,000 Instagram followers between two individual accounts. So they have a lot of people who are following their short-term rental journey and they've announced that they are moving away from Airbnb. They're not taking all their listings off, but they are not relying on Airbnb to bring them all their business anymore.

Heather Bayer

And what they're going to do is to become local experts and they're going to deliver their content – this is from this article and I'll put a link to it – so they're going to deliver content via social media, such as their Instagram accounts and their YouTube and blog posts and they're also going to collect email addresses via Wi-Fi – I guess they'll be using StayFi – and they are going to move to the direct booking strategy, which is what we've been saying for years. And I guess because I'm not spending huge amounts of time on Instagram and YouTube, my message hasn't got across as quickly as the Robinsons' message is going to. But this is interesting, they're future-proofing their business.

Heather Bayer

So I've got a few ideas here that I want to share with you that's going to help you bolster your foundation so you can deal with whatever comes in this coming year in terms of inequities in supply and demand and anything that Airbnb, Vrbo, and Booking.com might throw your way.

Heather Bayer

I've been hearing some awful stories of hosts, and managers even, being kicked off Airbnb without a reason. A guest has complained about something and the knee-jerk reaction appears to be, well, we'll just shut down this host and then they can come to us and find out why they were shut down, but in the meantime, they've lost their business. And I've heard from this from multiple people over the last six or eight months and it's very disturbing. It certainly is disturbing if you're one of those people and you had a lot of reservations in place and all of a sudden Airbnb tell you that they're all now canceled and Airbnb have taken it upon themselves to relocate all those people and you've now lost your income. You can't get back to your account on Airbnb until this issue has been resolved. For some the issue has been resolved, but not before they have lost reputation, for sure, and also income from all those bookings that were relocated by the all-benevolent Airbnb. So, like the Robinsons who've decided that they're going to implement all these different strategies now for helping them to move from their reliance on the OTAs, I'm going to give you some more ideas to help you do the same.

Heather Bayer

A lot of these I have talked about in previous podcasts. So this is perhaps a little bit of an amalgamation of some of these ideas that we've spoken about before and some of my guests have mentioned before, but I think it really is worthwhile hearing again.

Heather Bayer

So the first one is to diversify your marketing, and I'm quite sure if you're listening to this podcast, you aren't just advertising on Airbnb and hopefully I can give you just a few more pointers. So I mean, the same people who were driving everyone to Airbnb, ‘the gurus', are now pounding the pavement for direct bookings. They're building their own brands, their websites, their social media presence, and they're driving followers there rather than back to the platforms. These are the guys that were out there a year ago, two years ago, talking about how you can make your fortune by passive income. And we'll talk about that in a second, because there really is no such thing as passive income in short-term rental. There is work to be done, and a lot of work to be done.  If there is an Airbnb bust, which is unlikely, but not out of the realms of possibilities, these people are not reliant on that one platform anymore. They're not out there shouting about this any longer, because they've seen that there is the potential that reliance on a single platform could be their downfall. So I want you to consider, alongside of course building your own website, which we'll talk about in a second, but consider niche listing sites.

Heather Bayer

The people behind these sites want them to succeed. And I often see this in some of the Facebook groups and people will post and say, well, I'm not giving any money to these people because they don't have enough listings and they're not going to rent my property. But you know, if you don't support these entrepreneurs who are out there trying to get traction to their websites, nobody's going to succeed. The people behind the sites want them to succeed, so it's really worth putting your effort, maybe some of your marketing budget, behind them. What I'm talking about is things like the pet-friendly sites. Sarah Sokol from Dogs Welcome, Robert Geller from FabStayz, Nancy McAleer and Michelle Tattino from Florida Vacation Rentals by Owner, and many others who are out there creating these sites to help you to bring targeted rental guests to you. I really urge you to do the research and support them.

Heather Bayer

Another thing to do, and I'm going to talk about this a bit later on, is the fact that we often pay too much attention to online word-of-mouth marketing when in fact a very small percentage of word-of-mouth marketing is done online.  So people talk about you offline way more than they do online, and in fact, the reach of offline word-of-mouth is much wider as well. But we'll come to that. But I want you to consider in that diversification of your marketing to create some print brochures and some business cards, and if you haven't done that yet, it's not a huge expense anymore. You don't have to hire a graphic designer, you don't have to go to a local expensive print shop. You can now build something on Canva very, very simply, and if you don't have the graphic chops to do that, well hire somebody from Fiverr or Upwork to do it and you can get something that's extremely attractive, very presentable, very economically. If you do that, create some print brochures, then business cards, and then you hand them out to people you meet and just make sure that on every single piece of print material you have a QR code which leads them back to a specific landing page on your website. Simple!

Heather Bayer

So the second tactic or strategy is to really, really know your market and build content for them. I was going to just label this section as “Just Build Content”, but then I realized that there's no point in building content if you're not targeting it, if you don't know your market.

Heather Bayer

And I think people say at this time of year, what's your word for the New Year? Pick a word, and that will sort of define what you do. I quite like that concept, but I also like it not for a year, but for the next 90-days. So my particular word for the first quarter of 2023 is ‘content', because that's what I'm going to concentrate on for 90 days. But I'm concentrating on my content because I know my market, and I suggest if you don't know who your market is and you're just throwing spaghetti against the wall and hoping it will stick, that's your first task is to create your persona or your avatar and to build your content that actually directly addresses them. So of course this means that you have to already have a strong online presence, which includes a good website and some active social media accounts. You don't have to be active in everything, I'm suggesting probably Instagram or Facebook. But then again it comes back to knowing your market. Where does your market hang out? Because when you build your content, you're building your content for that particular target market and then you're going to put that content on those social media accounts where that audience is hanging out.

Heather Bayer

Doing this is going to help you attract new guests and it's going to build you a loyal customer base. But it's not enough though. You've got to build really good quality content for the site and your social media. I noticed that on the article about the Robinsons, they are talking about doing exactly that. They're talking about creating more YouTube videos, building more Instagram content, writing more blog posts, all about this local information that their guests, their target market, are looking for.

Heather Bayer

I've mentioned my favorite book, “They Ask You Answer” by Marcus Sheridan. I've mentioned this many times before because in that book he covers all the reasons that you should build content. I'll put a link to that at the end of the Show Notes. Read it – it's such a readable book. If you think that you aren't creative enough, you will come away from reading that book with a lot of ideas to build your content. And if you're concerned about writing and being creative, you can just start by telling some stories, and the starting point could simply be your About Us page – that is content. And if you're concerned about how do you write your About Us page, I'll put a couple of examples in the Show Notes of really good About Us pages, so just start by looking at those.

Heather Bayer

Another book for you is Ann Handley's “Everybody Writes”. It's a terrific book for anybody who is worried about – I was going to say putting pen to paper – putting fingers on the keyboard and starting to write, because she makes it very simple in a very readable fashion. I will put links to all these books I'm suggesting on the Show Note, so go there.

Heather Bayer

So I'm going to come back in a minute and I'm going to talk about diversifying your revenue streams, keeping up with industry trends, building your reputation, and not stopping learning. But for now, I just want to break for a minute. We were so excited to welcome OwnerRez as our sponsor for the next ten weeks, and you're going to be hearing a lot about OwnerRez from their co-founder, Paul Waldschmidt, and also from some very satisfied customers and supporters of OwnerRez. So let's go over to the first question that I asked of Paul Waldschmidt about why his clients choose OwnerRez in the first place.

Heather Bayer

Paul, your founders of OwnerRez were hosts and managers before developing the software. How did that help you to understand your clients' pain points when choosing property management softwares?

Paul Waldschmidt

Well, in general, I believe that using your own software is pivotal to producing a good product. And I believe that, generally speaking, across all software, across all industries, it's something that Chris and I, as software engineers, knew early on, two decades ago. There's a term for it called ‘dogfooding' in the software industry. Over the years, we continued to take action to keep our feet firmly rooted in the homeowner and PM experience. Even as OwnerRez grew, and our time got shorter that we could spend with guests and doing the ongoing booking management and guest interaction, we made sure that that company that we originally started as homeowners and PMs continued and continues to this day. My wife runs it and she has a small staff, but yes, it has been pivotal throughout the process. We've even developed little phrases like what would Shenrint do? Shenrint is the shorthand name of the company, but in dealing with little nuances like why a channel isn't distributing head information or the availability is wrong, when you see that yourself, it really plays out into what thousands of users are doing.

Heather Bayer

So over the next ten weeks, you're going to be hearing more from OwnerRez, but for now, let's move on to how to future-proof your business in 2023.

Heather Bayer

My third suggestion is to diversify your revenue streams. You may be relying on a single source of income, which is the rental that is coming into you. So you could consider adding additional revenue streams, such as offering additional products or services. You could think about doing mid-term/long-term rentals, maybe attracting different types of guests, maybe some business guests in the off-season. Look at traveling nurses, traveling medics, for example. And there's still a lot of people traveling the country servicing hospitals in different areas. So really, depending on where you live, you could look at some of those different revenue streams also dependent on your location. You could think about offering concierge services, offering other services that your guests might want, that you could generate some income from commission or add-ons, or any way that you could build the services you provide your guests and make yourself some extra income along the way. So this one takes some thinking about because you could be putting a lot of effort into something that is not going to bring you the return.  Have a look around and see what your competition are doing. If they're out there doing concierge services and they're clearly making some headway with it, then why not consider that as well?

Heather Bayer

I want to talk now about building a strong reputation, because this is something that I think maybe should have been out there as number one because it's focusing on providing excellent customer service and creating a positive guest experience, which of course helps you build a strong reputation and attracts that repeat business. The problem, and I mentioned this earlier, that we're going to talk about passive income because the problem with the ‘short-term rental as passive income' idea that took shape in the last couple of years is that all these new investors that came along, they were sold the myth that this business is easy. Just buy, furnish and equip, get a cleaner, post on Airbnb, and sit back while the money rolls in. It seems someone forgot to let them know that there was this thing called hospitality. They forgot to tell them that guests are going to ask a million questions, they're going to have problems that need to be dealt with and these guests can be oftentimes justifiably demanding.

Heather Bayer

If you listened to my earlier podcast a few weeks ago with Andy Meddick, when he was talking about a trip to Italy, we touched on the fact that some hosts, and indeed managers, have skipped the bit in the manual about this being a service industry where things go wrong and they've got to be fixed. Andy shared his experiences about that vacation in Italy where the customer service was so shoddy, his needs as a guest were sidestepped, and the result was a group of six people having to relocate after just one night of a five-night stay. And when that vacation has been planned for months and months and months in advance, that is serious stuff. If you want to hear more about that, you're going to have to go back to that episode. This past weekend I heard another similar incident. This time it took place in Australia and the guest on this occasion was Kevin Cartier and he owns a company called Elite Vacations, in Ottawa. So he is also a host, he's a property manager and he's got this very similar story to Andy's to tell from a recent visit to Sydney.

Heather Bayer

So he was in an apartment, he had issues around the Wi-Fi not working, some amenities breaking down and as far as he was concerned he relayed these problems to the host politely, factually, and without any angst or really being bothersome as a guest from his perspective. But the host claimed that everything was working fine and then clearly decided that his guest was too much work because the next thing Kevin knew he was contacted by Airbnb telling him that the reservation he had had been canceled by the host and he had to vacate the property. So on both these occasions, that's Kevin's and Andy's situations, Airbnb were actually not interested in the guest side of the story, which is really interesting because we so often hear it's the other way around, and neither Andy or Kevin were able to post reviews; Airbnb wouldn't allow it. So these influential guests, in fact, were not being difficult, and I say influential because they have word-of-mouth power, both of whom, they're in the industry, they can spread this message because they both had stories of their issues being handled badly or being completely dismissed. So not being able to review online, they're sharing their experiences offline, pretty widely because they've both been on the podcast, and now I'm sharing this with our thousands of subscribers.  It's an amazingly powerful form of delivering feedback.

Heather Bayer

I'm reading a book at the moment called “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger, and he says we overestimate the power of online social engagement for sharing stories and experiences like this. And he cites research that claims only 7% of word-of-mouth happens online. And since word-of-mouth is also the primary factor behind 20-50% of all purchasing decisions, it makes so much sense to work on providing excellence in every aspect of your business. So I've come quite a long way from saying you've got to build a strong reputation. You've got to focus on providing excellent customer service and creating a positive guest experience, because that helps you build the strong reputation. But, if you drop the ball, that could be seriously detrimental to your business. And in 2023, you cannot allow that to happen.

Heather Bayer

So if you need any further help with this, then read another one of my favorite books, and I've mentioned it over and over again, and that is John DiJulius “The Customer Service Revolution”. If you listen to the podcast, you'll know, I've mentioned John DiJulius delivering one of the best keynotes I've ever heard at a VRMA conference – it's a long time ago now –  but that still sticks in my mind some of the things that he said about customer service.  And I went out and bought the book, and I've read it over and over again. I have my copy of the book down here in Alabama, because I carry it everywhere with me, and it has highlights all over it. It's got post-it notes in it, and I quote from it all the time. Read that book. You'll never think about customer service in the same way again. So build your strong reputation. In 2023, you can shine out above the competition just by the service that you deliver.

Heather Bayer

Okay, next I'm going to talk about learning. Don't stop learning. Read, listen to podcasts, do courses, attend events, subscribe to newsletters. Never think you know everything as this industry changes every day. You've got to keep up with new technology, stay informed about industry trends and changes, and consider how they might affect your business. For example, if you're a regular listener, you may have listened to me talking to Bob Garner of EnviroRental, when he shared the highlights of the Booking.com report about sustainable travel. There are some great statistics in there about how many people are now looking for evidence that the short-term rental they're booking is operating sustainable practices.  I'd never have thought about that. I never thought that there are people who are practically looking for sustainability in their choices of a short-term rental. But if you hadn't read that sustainable travel report by Booking.com and listened to the podcast with Bob Garner, you wouldn't know that. So you need to be keeping yourself updated as to what is happening in every aspect of the industry. There's plenty of places you can go to keep up with industry news, keep up with the commentary that's going on around it and things like Skift, Phocuswright, and ShortTermRentalz, which is a great website that covers all sorts of things that are happening in the industry.

Heather Bayer

I talked to somebody a while back and the question was, “Who do you follow in the industry?” “Well, I don't. I'm too busy”, she said.  “I'm too busy to look up from my desk.” And I thought, well, this is a business that is not going to survive. If you're too busy to look up from your desk, then it's time to take stock of what's happening in your business and how you can put something in place so you are able to look over the parapet and see what's happening around you.  Because if you don't, you're going to be overtaken. You're going to be overtaken by other competitors, you're going to be overtaken by events. So you've got to spend some time doing that learning, because by implementing this strategy, and all the others that I've talked about, you can help ensure the long-term success of your short-term rental business.

Heather Bayer

So finally, I want you to plan for the unexpected. Were you ready for the pandemic when it happened in 2020? Did you have adequate cash flow in place to see you through a year if everything had shut down for that long? Fortunately, it didn't, but thinking back, did you have enough? Could you have survived? And we know that a number of businesses didn't survive and I'm hoping that the experience of that pandemic enabled you to plan ahead for any unexpected event that may happen in the future. I mean, planning for the unexpected, thinking about things like people resigning. What would happen if your general manager resigned and left you? What would happen if your best cleaner, or maybe you're only cleaner, raised their rate by 100% or decided that the property down the road was going to give them much more money and they were off?. Those are just a couple of potential things that could happen. So it's always worthwhile, and I've talked about this before, emergency planning to always have the plan in place in case something untoward happens that's entirely unexpected.

Heather Bayer

I just wanted to share with you this whole idea of future-proofing, because if you spend some time thinking about how you can make your business better, how you can make it more sustainable, how you can make it more solid, how you can build your reputation, build your brand, you're going to be a more successful business going into 2023 and beyond.

Heather Bayer

So that's me done talking about future-proofing. I think it's important for everyone in this business, even more so now, because we've had some strange years gone past, to spend more time thinking about how we keep our business going in the future. No way can we put this thing on autopilot and have it run super smoothly for the next twelve months. Things are going to happen that were entirely unexpected. Maybe you don't get enough bookings, maybe you have to change the way you do your business.  But at least if you've planned and you've prepared and you've some options in place, it's going to be a much easier process for you.

Heather Bayer

So I'm glad that I had this time to close out 2022 by sharing some of these ideas. Because I am using every single one of these ideas in my business, Vacation Rental Formula, over the next year.  I'm going to be doing exactly the same thing. You're going to see me building more content, diversifying our revenue streams. Of course, I keep up with industry trends, I read all the time, and we're working on building a strong reputation. So it works in every industry, in fact every business you're in, exactly these same tactics to future-proof your business.

Heather Bayer

So if you're listening on this day of publication, I hope you have a wonderful New Year celebration. Maybe you'll stay up to midnight, I certainly won't! I will welcome-in 2023 at about 4:30am on the morning of January 1, when I get up. Sad, isn't it? But that's how I roll, and we all roll differently. Thanks for listening, thanks for being around for this last year.

Heather Bayer

It's been an absolute pleasure to hear from so many of you. I've enjoyed your emails and your calls, getting you on a Zoom call. I'm so happy to speak to people, to have that connection with you. So you can get in touch with me at heather@vacationrentalformula.com, share your business with me, let me hear from you and I promise I will get back to you.

Mike Bayer

This episode was brought to you by OwnerRez. For more information about this internationally recognized leader in vacation rental software, click the link in the description of this episode on your smart device or head over to vacationrentalformula.com/ownerrez to find out more.

Heather Bayer

It's been a pleasure as ever, being with you. If there's anything you'd like to comment on, then join the conversation on the Show Notes for this episode at Vacation Rental Formula. We'd love to hear from you and I look forward to being with you again next week.